The Conventional South Indian Bride.

The Conventional South Indian Bride.

Traditionally, the south Indian bride showcases the magnificent temple jewellery characteristic of the region and popularised by temple dancers of yore. If you are planning to have a South Indian bridal look on your big day, then I have some tips and tricks that you can keep up your sleeve to look like the South Indian bride of your dreams.

The Nethi Chutti is a major ornament of the South-Indian bride’s wedding jewels. Worn along the parting of the hair, it is usually 3 lines of gold encrusted with precious stones such as rubies, emeralds, and uncut diamonds that frame the bride’s pretty face. It is incomplete without the accompanying sun and moon patterns that are placed on the left and right sides of the head. These signify the ida and pingla energy centers and bring together the divine forces of the sun and moon.

Rakkodi- Thirugupoo-Jada Billai- The adornment of the hair is completed with a rakkodi, placed exactly on the crown of the head or the sahsrara chakra. A disc of gold with rubies, emeralds, uncut diamonds and pearls, the rakkodi sits pretty atop a floral arrangement that sets it in focus. 

Vaira Todu – Jimikki-Maattal- The vaira thodu or diamond studs were originally conceptualised with seven stones of equal size arranged as a flower. But with time, the studs have found new expression and innovation. Mookuthi or Nose Pin- It is widely believed that the bride’s breath must touch the purity of a diamond before it reaches her groom. Thus, in several south Indian families, it is imperative for the bride to pierce her nose and wear a diamond nose pin.

Necklaces and Haarams- No bride lets go of the opportunity to invest in a beautiful wedding necklace and/or a haaram. The diamond choker is a popular choice as its sparkle cannot be masked even by the several layers of garlands.

Bangles- Bangles in gold, bangles with diamonds, bangles with rubies and emeralds, the typical wedding colours bedeck the bride’s arms adding to her splendour.

Anklets or Golusu and Metti- The bride finally beautifies her feet with anklets and toe rings, the latter being the mark of a married woman. These are traditionally made in silver as it is considered irreverent to wear gold on the feet.

Thaali- The thaali is a pendant that the groom ties around the bride’s neck. Initially strung along a thread made auspicious by turmeric paste, the thaali is eventually transferred to a long chain and must ideally rest alongside the heart as a mark of a husband’s love for his wife. Each family has its own unique thaali design and is perhaps the most romantic of all the bride’s fine jewels.

Share this post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *